Big dipper constellation in a dark blue sky

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  • Minnesota Skies: November

    Published10/30/2018 , By Parke Kunkle

    How far can you see with the naked eye? Maybe a few tens of miles from a mountain top on a clear day? how about 2.5 million light years away to the Andromeda Galaxy?
  • Bell Field Notes Project

    Published10/17/2018

    As you work your way through the new Bell Museum, you may spot what looks like chalk drawings of creatures and concepts high up on the wall. Those represent “field notes”—a way that scientists and others record observations. By making notes, collecting specimens, and seeking evidence, scientists are able to…
  • Minnesota Skies: October

    Published10/02/2018 , By Parke Kunkle

    Be sure to enjoy the sweet but less-caloric treats in the October sky… Mars, Saturn, and the Northern Cross.
  • Our Global Kitchen: Food, Nature, Culture

    Published09/21/2018

    Food does more than keep us alive. Meals are the places where families meet, business is conducted and where our senses are stimulated. Food connects us to the land, to cultural heritage, and to each other.
  • Minnesota Skies: September

    Published09/03/2018 , By Parke Kunkle

    Let’s compare the two brightest stars currently shining in Minnesota’s evening sky, Vega and Arcturus. Arcturus is the brightest star in the constellation of Boötes, and its diameter is about 25 times that of the sun! Our star will look like this in a few billion years.
  • Minnesota State Fair

    Published08/23/2018

    The 12-day run of the Minnesota State Fair is a fantastic opportunity to get to know Minnesota’s one and only land-grant University. Find the Bell Museum across the fairgrounds during the run of the Fair.
  • Goldy at the Bell

    Published08/06/2018

    Get a special tour of the new museum courtesy of the University of Minnesota’s Biggest Fan: Goldy Gopher!
  • Minnesota Skies: August

    Published08/01/2018 , By Parke Kunkle

    The planets continue their ballet in August. Add a meteor shower, and nature treats us to a wonderful show. All month, around dusk, look for brilliant Venus low in the W, Jupiter in the SW, Saturn in the SSE and ruddy colored Mars low in the SE.
  • Windows to Nature

    Published07/16/2018

    This documentary, collaboratively produced by the Bell Museum and Twin Cities PBS (TPT), follows the historic move and restoration of the Bell’s famous dioramas, now expertly preserved for new generations of museum visitors.
  • A Natural Progression

    Published07/09/2018 , By Susan Maas

    Growing up with Walter Breckenridge was an immersion in the natural world. Breck, as he was known, was a naturalist, conservationist, artist, filmmaker, and longtime director of the Bell Museum, which included being co-creator of many of our renowned dioramas.