A galaxy appears on dome screen inside the planetarium theater.

Planetarium Shows for School Groups

Visit the Whitney and Elizabeth MacMillan Planetarium

Back to K–12 Group Tours and Field Trips

The Whitney and Elizabeth MacMillan Planetarium offers a wide variety of programs in our state-of-the art domed theater. With interactive live programs and recorded presentations, teachers will find content to fit their learning objectives. Learners of all ages will be amazed and inspired.

School Showtimes

9:30am, 10:30am, 11:30am, 12:30pm, 1:30pm

Run time is 45 minutes per show. 

Orion constellationMinnesota Night Skies

Grade Levels: K—6

The skies above Minnesota carry a hidden treasure trove. Join planetarium staff in discovering the seasonal constellations, visible planets, and other astronomical objects that you can see in your sky tonight. From the Moon to a deep space nebula, there’s something in the sky for everyone.

Standards
2009 MN Science Standards:

  • 0.1.1.2.1
  • 0.3.2.2.2

2019 MN Science Standards:

  • 0P.1.2.1.1 
  • 0E.1.1.1
  • 0P.2.1.1

Illustration of our solar systemOut of this World

Grade Levels: 1—6

Explore the solar system in a show where you are the copilot!  Investigate the Moon, be the first humans to land on Mars, fly through the rings of Saturn, or find out what makes a planet a planet.  No matter which planet (or Pluto) is your favorite, you’re sure to learn something new on this tour of our planetary neighborhood.

Standards
2009 MN Science Standards:

  • 1.1.1.1.2
  • 2.1.1.2.1
  • 2.2.1.1.1
  • 2.2.2.1.2
  • 3.1.1.2.1
  • 3.2.3.1.3
  • 3.3.3.2.2

2019 MN Science Standards:

  • 1P.2.1.1 
  • 2P.1.1.1.1
  • 3P.1.1.1.1 
  • 3E.2.1.1.1 
  • 5E.2.2.1.2
  • 5E.4.1.1.1
  • 6E.1.1.1.1
  • 6E.2.1.1.1
  • 6E.3.1.1.1

Graphic of brain synapsesMysteries of Your Brain

Grade Levels: 3—7

Jump into an immersive, animated adventure following a girl and her crow companion exploring what makes the human brain so special.  Together you’ll zoom along the paths of neurons, find out how human and animal brains differ, and experience illusions on a grand scale. Along the way you’ll learn how your brain makes you, well, you and see that ultimately, we each have the power to change our brains.

Standards
2009 MN Science Standards:

  • 2.2.1.1.1
  • 3.4.1.1.1
  • 4.2.3.1.3 
  • 5.4.1.1.1
  • 6.1.3.1.1 
  • 7.4.1.1.1
  • 7.4.1.2.1

2019 MN Science Standards:

  • 3L.4.2.1.1 
  • 4L.4.1.1.1
  • 6E.1.1.1
  • 7L.1.1.1.1 
  • 7L.1.2.1.1 
  • 7L.3.1.1.1 
  • 7L.4.1.1.1

view of Earth from space with clouds in the shape of MinnesotaMinnesota in the Cosmos

Grade Levels: 4—8

Explore the deep cosmic and geologic history of the land beneath our feet through the eyes of a boy on a field trip to Interstate State Park.  Starting with the formation of the solar system, follow along on this uniquely Minnesota journey through time and space.

Standards
2009 MN Science Standards:

  • 5.1.1.1.3 
  • 5.1.3.4.2
  • 5.3.1.2.2
  • 7.4.3.2.1
  • 7.4.3.2.4
  • 8.3.1.2.2

2019 MN Science Standards:

  • 4E.3.2.1.1
  • 5P.3.1.1.1
  • 6E.2.1.1.2
  • 6E.3.2.1.1
  • 6E.4.1.1.1
  • 7L.2.1.1.2

2011 MN Social Studies Standards:

  • 2.4.1.1.1
  • 6.3.3.6.1

Temperance River Minnesota Water Stories

Grade Levels: 4—8

Minnesota is the land of 10,000 lakes, where the water reflects the sky. Water is essential to life and we all have connections to it, yet there are challenges facing our waters. Minnesota Water Stories explores those challenges, current research, and the opportunities we have to protect our most precious resource.

Standards
2009 MN Science Standards:

  • 4.3.2.3.1 
  • 4.3.4.1.1 
  • 8.1.3.4.1 
  • 8.3.2.3.1 

2019 MN Science Standards:

  • 4E.1.1.1.2  
  • 4E.2.2.1.1 
  • 6E.3.1.1.3  
  • 6E.3.2.1.2 
  • 6E.3.2.1.3

Yellow light surrounding black hole Unseen Universe

Grade Levels: 8—12

Take a look into cutting edge astronomy and explore the universe far beyond what our human senses can tell us. For millions of years, our view of the heavens has been limited by our eyes, allowing us to only see a narrow band of electromagnetic radiation that we call visible light. For the first time ever, in the greatest breakthrough since the invention of the telescope, we now have the technology to capture the Universe over an amazing width of the electromagnetic spectrum and beyond. We can even interlink telescopes around the world to capture data on a global scale.

Standards
2009 MN Science Standards:

  • 9.1.1.1.2 
  • 9.1.1.1.6
  • 9.1.3.3.3
  • 9.2.3.2.7
  • 9.3.3.3.1
  • 9P.2.3.3.4
  • 9P.2.3.3.6

2019 MN Science Standards:

  • 9E.2.1.1.1
  • 9E.3.2.1.1
  • 9P.1.1.1.1

Sponsor logos from: WEM Foundation, General Mills, 3M, and Manitou Fund