Loading Events
Closeup of green and orange butterfly wing
  • This event has passed.

After Hours: The Last Butterflies

Wednesday | July 24, 2019 | 5:00 pm8:30 pm

Enjoy an evening at the museum, open until 8:30 pm for this After Hours event. Whether you’re sketching, photographing, painting, or coloring, let inspiration be your guide as you curate your evening from a host of activities, including a show in the Whitney and Elizabeth MacMillan Planetarium or tonight’s special talk. Weather permitting, telescope observation will be offered on the Ruth and John Huss Observation Deck.

Also, join guest makers Jonathan Koffel and Karen Haselmann of UMN Libraries in Solution Studio for an AR/VR playground.

Activities free with gallery admission. Planetarium ticket fees apply.

Special Guests: Ecologist Nick Haddad

Cover of The Last Butterflies and photo of author Nick HaddadNick Haddad will hold a book talk and signing in the Nucleus, beginning at 7 pm.

Most of us have heard of such popular butterflies as the Monarch or Painted Lady. But what about the Fender’s Blue? Or the St. Francis’ Satyr? Because of their extreme rarity, these butterflies are not well-known, yet they are remarkable species with important lessons to teach us. The Last Butterflies spotlights the rarest of these creatures―some numbering no more than what can be held in one hand. Drawing from his own first-hand experiences, Nick Haddad explores the challenges of tracking these vanishing butterflies, why they are disappearing, and why they are worth saving. He also provides startling insights into the effects of human activity and environmental change on the planet’s biodiversity.

Nick Haddad is a professor and senior terrestrial ecologist in the Department of Integrative Biology and the W. K. Kellogg Biological Station at Michigan State University. He lives in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Lunar Samples on View

Don’t miss the lunar sample disks on display in Collections Cove tonight. Each six-inch sample disk encapsulates three samples each of lunar rock and lunar soil in clear Lucite.

On loan from NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, the samples come from six different missions between 1969 and 1972 and include a wide variety of rock and soil types. You can see bits of ancient lava flows, soil from sites across the Moon, and volcanic ash from a lunar eruption 3.5 billion years ago.

Tiny Moon Rocks

Hold samples collected by Apollo astronauts in your hands! On loan from NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, the six-inch disk contains three samples each of lunar rock and lunar soil encapsulated in clear Lucite. The samples come from missions between 1969 and 1972 and include a wide variety of rock and soil types. You can see bits of ancient lava flows, soil from sites across the Moon, and volcanic ash from a lunar eruption 3.5 billion years ago.

Planetarium

6 pm: One Giant Leap
7 pm: Minnesota Night Sky

Click here for tickets and availability.

Advance tickets for planetarium shows are available up to three weeks ahead of time via the link above. If you are a current Bell member, please log in first, to receive your discounted tickets.

Details

Date:
Wednesday | July 24, 2019
Time:
5:00 pm–8:30 pm
Event Category:
Event Tags:

Venue

Bell Museum
2088 Larpenteur Avenue W
St Paul, 55113

« All Events